The Horned God and the Summer Solstice

The Horned God and The Summer Solstice
The seasons have shifted once more,  the days have become longer and now  it is time for the Litha celebration.   The longest day of the year,  the Summer Solstice.

This is the time of year to celebrate the masculine half of the sacred energy that rules nature.  This energy is represented by a few deities,  The Horned God,   Ceronnous,  Pan,  Herne the Hunter, and the Green Man just to name a few.  With his mighty horns he is the protector of the forest,  the god of animals and vegetation.  When he is in his Sun form  he is the giver of life to the crops. He is the God of fertility, of ecstatic music and dance, and wild nature.

Whatever you may call him, or what ever form you choose, the Horned God is an ancient one.  He has been worshiped in Europe since at least the Iron Age, where he has been found depicted in cave drawings.  The Horned God is the keeper of the cycle of life and the food chain.He is pure masculinity, virility, and sex. He is the deer in  rut, the predator hunting the prey.  For him  there is only survival or death.  He makes you face these facts with no sympathy

He is born in the spring and spends his childhood and young adulthood in the forest as pan or the green man. Wild and free he runs,  dances and plays his pipes.  He falls in love with, and impregnates the Goddess. In the midsummer he becomes The Horned One in the prime of his life. When Autumn arrives it is  time for the harvest.  The crops that he fed all spring and summer with his life giving sunshine are harvested, the animals slaughtered, and The Horned One is sacrificed. His blood fertilizes the land for the next spring. The crops go dormant, and   he travels to land of the dead, becoming the caretaker of the souls who have passed on.  When spring arrives he is reborn as the child that is carried by the goddess. The cycle begins again.

We can celebrate the energy of the summer solstice. Here are few ideas:

  • This is the longest day of the year,  and you can greet the sun at sunrise and say good bye at sunset.  Giving thanks to the Sun for all the life giving warmth it has bestowed upon us
  • Try making some sun tea,  Get a llarge glass jar,  make your own teabags or prepared teabags and put several in the jar,  fill with water and let it steep in the sun all day
  • Make an infused oil or honey.  put some olive oil in a clear jar, add some lemongrass, garlic rosemary whatever you like,  and place in the sun for the day. For a delicious honey treat, use rose petals that are organic or you know have not been chemically treated and infuse them in some raw natural honey.
  • Do an outdoor activity that brings you close to nature, kayaking swimming, nature walking.
  • have a midsummer nights fire
Whatever you decide to do,  enjoy your midsummer day,  the longest day of the year, have a Blessed Litha,  a Merry Christmas,  Happy Holiday, and a wwonderful New Year.